Thursday, August 27, 2009

Eyesore



I harvested our first pumpkin. A little early for Halloween, but never too early for pumpkin pie. Or pumpkin muffins, or pumpkin bread, or pumpkin cookies...


Hubby finished building our new clothesline. He stretched it out from one side of the playset. We've already told the boys not to use it as a zip-line. The cotton ropes stretch quite a bit when the clothes are hung, but after some tightening and weeks in the sun and the rain they should be great.

My sister lives in a suburb of St. Paul, in a housing subdivision. It's a very nice neighborhood with beautiful houses and perfectly manicured lawns. But they're not allowed to have clotheslines, apparently because they are an eyesore. We are both confused by this. How could a clothesline be an eyesore?

When I came home yesterday and saw our shirts and socks and towels and napkins hung out on the line, an incredible feeling of well-being came over me. A feeling of home, of summer, of ease and tranquility. I guess I've been brainwashed by Norman Rockwell. That, and the fact that we're saving money by not using our electric dryer, makes a clothesline an asset to any homestead, rural or urban.

8 comments:

Erin said...

I agree about the clothesline...your picture immediately brought a smile to my face! I would think Saint Paul would be a little more eco-friendly, especially since they allow urban chickens! My brother lives there too (Frogtown) in an old cute bungalow they restored. I think a clothes line in their backyard would look cheery! I have a simple retractable one that I bought but haven't used it yet since the pollen here is atrocious! Yellow covers our cars, siding, everything! But the kids did paint outside and use it to hang their creations!

Anonymous said...

I alway heard it brings good luck if you make pumpkin muffins from the first-picked pumpkin, then, you know, send those pumpkin muffins to city-livin' friends. :)

-Lor

Rick said...

I always thought that the prohibition was due to the old class distinction. Rich people got dryers first so for a while hanging laundry was like a sign that read "Working Poor Live Here!". I think many of the rules against livestock and vegetable gardens stem from that.

My personal theory anyway.

Joaquín Espinosa said...

Hello! My name is Joaquín. I'm from Guadalajara, Mexico. I've started reading your blog and I I find it really interesting. I began reading last year's entries but had to stop because of my job. I was sent to Tulancingo, Hidalgo and I haven't had time to continue reading. Today I had some free time so, I continued reading. but I have to go now. I just wanted to tell you how much I liked your blog. Keep up the good work. I hope to continue reading your entries.

Jo said...

Hey Erin! I've been to Frogtown many times -- used to have a friend who lived just off of Rice St. and Maryland. Where does your pollen come from? It would be cool to see a picture of yellow covering everything!

Lorelei! Thanks for letting me know about the first pumpkin rules. Silly me, I knew nothing of them! Now if I actually find time to do something with the pumpkin (rather than let it sit in my basement for months), I will be sure to try to garner all the good luck I can. :)

Hey Rick -- your theory sounds more plausible than what the homeowners association told my sister. Perhaps they gave her the 'eyesore' story because they didn't want to seem so obviously snooty and classist. Then again, I don't think they worry about obvious classism in Woodbury.

Hello Joaquin -- thanks for your nice comments. I am always pleased when someone finds and enjoys my blog. Good luck with your new job!

Harold Phillips said...

Yeah, I think Rick's right on the money there... as rediculous as it is in today's power-hungry, resource-depleted world, class distinctions still hold sway. Glad to see you guys are doing things the old-fashioned way, Jo! :) We had one for a while, but the little pavilion that we ran it through collapsed during last year's snow (imagine, we live in a place where snow in the winter is an oddity... I know, I know, we are alien to your Minnesota sensibilities :) ). We need to figure out how to put a new one up. Thanks for the reminder!

It's me ...Mavis said...

I live in one of those subdivisions (in Seattle) with the manicured lawns....it's torture I tell you......I am the only one in here with a garden, chickens, and a secret (small) illegal clothes line on the back porch. The neighbors may laugh at me and think I'm a little nutty (for growing food)....but they sure don't mind when I offer extra backyard grown organic produce. Ahhh neighbors....gotta love 'em.

Jo said...

Hi Harold! Yes, Rick is most likely right. So far we have had good luck with clothes and sheets on the line. Thick things, like towels and jeans do end up quite stiff. But it's something we can get used to.

Hello Mavis -- nice to hear from you. It's great that your neighbors don't snitch about your contraband chickens and clothesline. Free veges always help in public relations!