Saturday, November 5, 2011

What's at stake

Earlier this fall I was driving past a old farmstead grove when I noticed some familiar green wisps rising out of the dying grass.  Asparagus!  I made a mental note to return to the area with some wooden stakes, to mark the areas so I could find them next spring.


The fall has been fairly busy, so I didn't actually manage to get back out there until yesterday.  The asparagus was still bright and green though, easy to spot.  The ground was so matted with roots and fibers, and the clay soil so dry, that pounding in the stakes was a Herculean effort.  For me, at least.  After four of them I gave up, and instead tried to secure the stakes within the rusted barbed wire that littered the entire area.


I also found a plant laden with small red berries.  I picked a handful and put them into my pocket in hopes of starting some asparagus from seed.  Never done it before, not sure how it will work.


Now I just need to remember the stakes next spring, when asparagus season rolls around again.  Or else all my effort will be for naught!

10 comments:

dr momi said...

Saving the asparagus seed is easy Jo. Check out the post I wrote on it. It's in my "most popular posts" section. Chickens like the berries too!

Craftsteader said...

Wild asparagus is a wonderful treat. I'm sure you'll remember it in spring!

Leigh said...

What a fantastic find Jo. So glad you could get at least a few.

And Dr. Momi, so glad to learn the chickens like the berries! I'm trying to find seeds from things I grow that they like to eat.

Mama Pea said...

When we lived in Illinois, we gathered asparagus that grew "wild" along the railroad tracks. It was a treat. Hoping you get a nice harvest next spring from this "found" asparagus.

Erin said...

What a nice find! Can't wait to see what happens with it!

LindaSue said...

Been reading your blog along with many other farm blogs. Hope to get started this spring on our own acre. Decided to go back to the start on your blog and now am up to Aug 2009.

We live here in SE Ala and this spring/summer I found several farms that offer their produce just picked or pick your own at a nice savings.

Had to post after seeing your corn post. An old and established farm here has a great old farmer who is full of knowledge.
All told I bought 4 bushels of just picked Alabama sweet white corn from him. He told me it takes 60 ears of corn to make a bushel.

Here is the great thing. He told me to take the corn, husks and all and put them in a paper sack and put them in the freezer just like that. I was a little anxious as can be expected ( I come from the south side of Chicago, so what do I know about farming anyway). Didn't have any paper sacks so I came home, cut the tassels off and the extra stalk. Pulled off a few of the layers of the green covering and put 10 at a time in the gallon plastic bags I had. Put 120 ears of corn into the freezer this way. I take them out frozen, wrap in aluminum foil and put on the top shelf of the grill for 30 min or so. And, also wrap them frozen and put them in the toaster oven for 30 or 45 min along with whatever else I am baking. Comes out tasting like it was just picked. What an easy way to put up the corn and what a delicious way to eat it. Of course, I had to go out and buy another freezer to put it in, but that was ok, cause it just gave me more room to put up other stuff.

Just wanted to pass along a great way to put up corn on the cob, so easy and quick. Also he said if you let it thaw you can just cut it off the cobb then. Haven't tried that cause I cut off about 60 ears to put up that way.

LindaSue said...

OK Just finished all the post's. Lordy, so much info and so many questions. Now I have to go back and make notations on what I want to ask you about. Will that be ok?

I am having trouble with my hotmail right now. But send me an email anyway. Thanks

Jo said...

dr. momi -- thanks for the link! I am encouraged to try it even more.

Craftsteader -- I hope so! You can remind me in late April, okay? :)

Leigh -- Yes, I was pretty pleased myself!

Mama Pea -- We have lots of asparagus in roadsides in this area, but I am always afraid that they have been sprayed by the county or township weed control. Railroad tracks would have been okay, though. It is indeed a treat!

Erin -- Thanks!

LindaSue -- I'm glad you're enjoying my posts. Hard to believe I've been doing this for nearly four years now! And thanks for the tip about freezing corn. I must remember that next August! I'll go to your site and send an email toot sweet. Thanks!

Deanna said...

Gee, I found an old homestead with asparagus gone to seed that I am going to check out in the spring. Wonder if it could be the same spot. Maybe I will see you there. I might be a little further north than you, though.

Love reading your blog.

Jo said...

Hey Deanna -- Seeing as the grove I'm talking about is about a mile from my house, and you live in MA, it would be quite the coincidence if you and I ended up in the same asparagus patch! But stranger things have happened, I suppose... Thanks for the kind words.